DIFFERENT WORLDS AND FORMS OF THE MODERN FANTASTIC

Iva Dimovska

ABSTRACT

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ABSTRACT

The modern fantastic literature, according to Roger Bozzetto, is an area that can be compared to the phenomena of the psychosis: the main characteristic of these works is the attempt to disorientate the character/s (and the reader/s) by creating a world where the fantastic does not result (like in the case of typical fantastic literature, according to the premises of Tzvetan Todorov) from the intrusion of the supernatural in a realistic surrounding, but it’s an effect of the absurd and irrational, that materializes itself through an imperceptible disorder that transforms the basis of everyday life.

This can be achieved in many various ways, but it’s safe to say the literary works of the Argentine authors Jorge Luis Borges and Julio Cortázar represent the both most diverse and different forms of the modern fantastic literature of the XX century.

They both show the imperfections of the reasonable objectivity, by relaying on totally different literary techniques and symbolical systems. Whilst Cortázar creates a modern world, miscellaneously presenting it’s instantaneousness with the help of the psychological register, making it impossible for the reader to decipher the force of the mysterious; Borges uses a religious, theological, and metaphysical symbolical repertoire in order to create a intangible universe, based on the schemes of the transcendent, archaic and the ancient imagination, transforming the archetypes of the imaginary in his own esthetical and artistic universe that unites the symbols of the Library, the Labyrinth, and the Book.

In Borges’s world, the effect of the fantastic develops as a result of the existence of a parallel universe, and it’s based on the rules of a metaphysically and scientifically oriented speculation. Cortázar’s works show us a universe where the fantastic is a part of our own world. It originates directly from the hidden and unknown depths of the reality that surrounds us.

Thus, in Borges’s works the fantastic is a direct result of the existence of a new reality, and in Cortázar’s it results as a consequence of a process that leads us to the extreme borderlines of our own, familiar reality.

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